Degree Date

12-2016

Document Type

Dissertation - Public Access

Degree Name

Ed.D. Doctor of Education

Academic Discipline

Educational Leadership

First Advisor

Norman Weston

Second Advisor

Jack Denny

Third Advisor

Harrington Gibson

Abstract

The purpose of this program evaluation was to gain a clear understanding of how homework supports or deters the achievement of students, specifically the overall grade a student attains. This document details how students and teachers at a suburban Middle School perceive homework and its effect on student learning. The findings were that many students received failing grades in classes, primarily due to missing homework. The program evaluation used mixed methodology. Using survey and focus group results in conjunction with current literature, the conclusion revealed a need for homework policies that would support student learning without punishing students’ grades. Students shared that they have busy lives and much of the homework is challenging for them to complete on their own. Teachers shared feelings of how subjective homework policies and grading can be, and they agreed that policies should be designed with this in mind. The recommendations made were for policies that are more consistent, and that grading policies do not put too much emphasis on homework as part of an overall grade.